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Trampoline safety net buying guide

Guide written by:
Sebastian, self-taught DIY-er, Exeter

Sebastian, self-taught DIY-er, Exeter

177 guides
Trampoline safety nets are used to stop you from jumping off the bounce mat and landing on the ground or any surrounding objects. Highly recommended – but not mandatory – these nets come supplied with some trampolines and can be fitted to any model of the same size. Read on to find the right net for your trampoline!

Important features

  • Size
  • Installation
  • Design

Why use a trampoline safety net?


While fitting your trampoline with a safety net
is not obligatory, it is recommended in certain cases:
  • if you have a small trampoline (245 or 305 cm, for example). This is due to the fact that you are closer to the edge so there is an increased risk of jumping outside of the bounce zone;
  • safety nets are recommended for children aged 10 or less who tend to ignore safety rules (such as jumping too close to the edge or in groups);
  • if you are unable to set aside a 2- to 3-metre safety clearance around the trampoline.

Size and features of trampoline safety nets


There are various factors to consider when buying a trampoline net.
  • The net should be suited to the size of the trampoline. Trampolines generally come in standard sizes of 244 cm, 305 cm, 366 cm and 427 cm. However, it is possible to find models in intermediate sizes (180 cm, 330 cm, 396 cm or 520 cm). You can leave an acceptable gap of around 4 cm between the trampoline and the safety net.
  • Trampolines usually measure around 160 to 180 cm in height.
  • The net fixes to the trampoline posts which are covered by foam sleeves. The number of posts depends on the number of legs your trampoline has. While some brands will allow you to replace the safety net alone, others will require you to purchase the full set (posts and net) at the same time.
  • Different models will feature different opening systems. While most are equipped with a zip, some are supplied with a long net that folds back by about one metre, allowing children to enter the trampoline easily.
  • The weight of the net will determine its strength. Nets are usually made of polyester with a weight of 90 mg/m² (the higher the mg/m², the stronger the material).

Fitting a trampoline net


Please take note of the following when installing a trampoline safety net:
  • the posts should be fixed to the U-shaped legs of the trampoline using screws or other metal fixings;
  • one-piece nets are fitted via special openings in the material designed to be slotted over the foam-covered posts;
  • it is possible to fit the net around the jump mat (with the safety mat on the outside) or around the outside edge of the trampoline.
Finally, remember that trampoline safety nets allow your children to have fun while staying safe.

More information

More information For more information on trampolines and related accessories, check out the following guides from our editors: Trampoline buying guide How to install a trampoline How to set up a trampoline Trampoline accessories buying guide Trampoline safety pad buying guide Trampoline ladder buying guide Trampoline safety pad buying guide Trampoline fixings buying guide Trampoline, slide and swing set buying guide Swimming pool buying guide Inflatable pool buying guide Pool toys buying guide Paddling pool buying guide Swimming inflatables and armbands buying guide Outdoor playset buying guide Swing set buying guide Football table buying guide Basketball net and backboard buying guide Ping-pong table buying guide Sandpit buying guide Bouncy castle buying guide Slide buying guide Playset buying guide Kids' playhouse buying guide
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Guide written by:

Sebastian, self-taught DIY-er, Exeter 177 guides écrits

Sebastian, self-taught DIY-er, Exeter

Redo a roof with wooden beams? Check.
Advise Mister everybody in the DIY shop? Check.
Redo the bathroom plumbing? Check.
Fit together, build the walls, paint a partition, throw my hammer in a rage thinking that it will fix the problem? Check.

The DIY motto ? Learning is better than delegating… well, it's also a question about your wallet! The satisfaction? The beer at the end of the job!
What do the best have in common? The influence of Gyro Gearloose, Mac Gyver and Carol Smiley depending on your generation, a good dose of curiosity, a average hand-eye coordination and a taste for risks… and if it doesn't work, try again! Advise you? I'll do my best!

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